Why are numbers in German written in reverse order?

Did you know that 21 is read in Russian as "twenty-one". In German it is the other way around: "one and twenty". In addition, German numerals are written together, forming large words of several tens of letters: so 891 724 achthunderteinundneunzigtausendsiebenhundertvierundzwanzig is the longest word in the German language.

Over the past 500 years, writers and mathematicians have consistently pointed out the problem of skewed numbers. But all their attempts to change anything were crushed from above.

It is reported that due to the usual for Germans naming two-digit numbers in reverse order, unpleasant situations with incorrectly written phone numbers, errors in bank transfers, of which 7 billion a year are registered only within Germany, are very common.

Such cases in Germany are noticeably more frequent than in other countries.

The reason for this, the researchers note, is that in the computer age, Germans still pronounce polydigital numbers in the same confusing way as their ancestors.

The problem appeared in 1482, when Arabic numerals began to be used in written German, at the same time it was recommended to read them from left to right. As, for example, it was done in the first German textbook of arithmetic by Jakob Köbel.

The reason why Koebel did not manage to defend his idea was, in particular, Martin Luther, who looked people in the mouth and in his translation of the Bible adhered to the usual manner of speaking that arose 4000 years ago.

Then, in the absence of numbers, the Indo-Germans scrawled signs on the tags: always first ones (one dash for 1, two for 2, and so on) and only then tens (X as a symbol of crossed arms for 10). Therefore, IXX was read as "one and twenty".

Over the past 500 years, writers and mathematicians have consistently pointed out the problem of skewed numbers. But all their attempts to do something were crushed from above.